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Ship Fitting Guide (AKA: What to Fly and How to Fit it?)


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#1 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:31 PM

NOTE: This is a work in progress. Feedback will be appreciated, but obviously not all content is present, so please criticise current content and make suggestions on future content, rather than criticising the lack of it.

Forward:
This is a long and comprehensive guide that likely covers some information that you either already know, or aren't interested in knowing right now. As such, it is split into multiple sections - each of which is contained in a separate post within this thread, and each is designed to be read somewhat independently of each other. As such, feel free to skip through the guide to the parts that you are interested in.

Most experienced players will not find the majority of this guide useful - they may be interested in the external links for further reading, but otherwise you may have to just ask questions like the rest of us. Questions aren't limited to older players however, so feel free to ask questions, whether you are new or old. ;)

Table of Contents:

1. Flying Ships in Red vs. Blue
This section covers basic advice on ship progression and ship choice, with respect to the unique nature of RvB. Also briefly mentioned are skills to train into and long term goals.
2. The Basics of Ship Fitting
This section covers the very basics of ship fitting, and is likely too simple for the majority of players. It covers basic concepts such as fitting restrictions, and tips to make the most of fitting, as well as concepts like EHP and DPS.
3. Ship Roles
This section discusses the main "roles" within a fleet, explaining which ships typically excel at them, and why.
4. Small Ship Types (Frigates and Destroyers)
This section covers the different types of Frigates and Destroyers, explaining what they are good at, and covering the majority of their uses. Frigates and Destroyers are some of the most frequently flown ships in RvB.
5. Medium Ship Types (Cruisers and Battlecruisers)
This section covers Cruisers and Battlecruisers - the backbone of most RvB fleets, and where most role versatility is found.
6. Large Ships and Beyond (Battleships, Carriers, Dreadnoughts, Supercarriers and Titans)
This section briefly covers the larger ships in EVE - these are rarely seen in RvB, so each is covered in less detail.
7. Ship Statistics
This section covers all relevant statistics for ships in EVE. It covers both in-game statistics (e.g. Resists, Damage, etc) as well as derived statistics (e.g. DPS, EHP), and the main ways to achieve them.
8. Advanced Ship Fitting - for Flying in Red Vs. Blue
This section is the culmination of this guide, taking the information from the other sections and putting it to use, giving suggestions on the most common way to fit ships, and covering niche uses, like Wormhole fits, Scout fits etc.
9. Further Reading and Additional Resources
This section is not a "guide", but a repository for useful resources. Most of them give you help when playing EVE, and so are not restricted to purely ship fitting. Of particular note are the many different stand-alone programs available, for various platforms. Even if the rest of the guide is not for you, this section is probably worth a brief look.

Edited by Andal Altol, 23 June 2014 - 09:17 AM.

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#2 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

1. Flying Ships in Red vs. Blue
Table of Contents:
  • Which ship?
  • Skill Training
  • Racial Differences
  • Long Term Goals
 
To understand why fitting and flying advice here is different to the rest of the EVE Universe, you may wish to read through this section. If instead, you are worried about simply picking and fitting your ships, you may want to skip to the next section.

Red vs. Blue is different from most Corporations in EVE - we are based in High Security space, and all ships you fly are going to blow up, sooner rather than later. The difference is that we look for good fights - fights with a (roughly) even balance between sides. Regardless of who comes out on top, most people will lose at least one ship in a fight. If you don't want to lose it, don't fly it.

Most engagements in RvB are "Cruiser Down" - what that means is people will be flying hulls of Cruiser size or smaller (including T2 cruiser variants). This is mostly a cost issue - hull prices go up sharply as hull size increases. Realistically, you can fly what you want, but if all goes to plan you will have lost it by the end of the day.

Which Ship?

With that in mind, many players follow a simple progression:
  • T1 Frigate
  • T1 Destroyer*
  • T1 Cruiser
  • T2 Frigate
  • T2 Cruiser
  • T1 Battlecruiser*
Picking the ship from their race that best suits their play style. While you don't have to be bound by race, since you're likely already skilled in the racial ship types (e.g. Amarr Frigate III, Amarr Destroyer I), it can make it much faster to get flying the ship of your choice.

Most of the time, you can fly whatever you want, but at special events, or during wars with other corporations, there may be suggestions/requirements on what you should be flying. If you are taking part in an event (like Ganked) you will want to check the suggestions/requirements for what you should fly. Event details are typically posted at least a week in advance, so if you don't have all of the skills necessary, you should have at least a week to "skill into" the ship required. Most events will have some ship builds set aside for new players - including the ubiquitous "fast tackle" frigates that you will likely be used to flying.

The two most important rules when picking a ship are:
1) Don't fly something you can't afford to replace multiple times.
2) Pick something you enjoy flying.

Skill Training:

Skills are essential for any pilot. Piloting a ship with the minimum required skills will usually be a disaster in PvP. There is no hard minimum on the number of skill points required to be successful, and even a character in their first day can contribute to a fleet action, however there are many skills that are virtually essential to advanced fitting. Before training into the larger ships, you would do well to train the following:

<Skills go here>

<Reasons why go here>

Racial Differences:

<Brief comparison of weapons/tanking types/racial hulls goes here.>

Long Term Goals:

<Explain progression, T2/3 hulls, larger vs. smaller hulls and cost here.>
 
* Destroyers largely use the same skills as Frigates of the same race (as they share weapons) and Battlecruisers often share skills as the Cruisers of the same race. As such, they represent a simple upgrade path. As the lower-size hull (Frigates and Cruisers) have more variations, they may be superior for certain things (e.g. Logistics/Ewar/sniping). Larger hulls are not always better, but they are usually tougher.

Edited by Andal Altol, 23 June 2014 - 12:02 PM.

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#3 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

2. The Basics of Ship Fitting:

We have plenty of topics on good "fits" for different ships, but there will come a time when you want to fly a ship that you have fitted yourself. Making a good fit is very difficult, but understanding the basics is very simple.

There are three slot types where modules of different sorts may be fitted - "High", "Medium" and "Low", and a fourth slot type "Rigs" where you can place "rigs". When placed, rigs may not be removed, and so care should be taken before placing them.

Tech and Meta Levels
Modules come in different "meta" varieties - there is the "standard" variety (Tech 1 - for example, "Damage Control I"), and then modules of increasing potency as their meta rating increases (e.g. "Emergency Damage Control I" is a meta-1 item). Tech 2 items are always better than their Tech 1 in some respect, but it may not always be best to fit them - in fact, high meta modules are usually easier to fit than Tech 2 modules, and so are often more desirable - in some cases, the meta 4 version of a module may be as good or better than the tech 2 equivalent. The point to take from this is to learn how to use the in-game "compare" function, to work out which version(s) you are after, and then price them up on the market.

If you are interested, you can find a complete list of modules where the Meta 4 version is better than the T2 version.

One notable exception is when fitting T2 turrets - they allow you to use T2 ammunition, which can often be a fantastic boon (e.g. Scorch ammunition makes Pulse Lasers good at range). T2 weapons also have a second skill to give them a damage bonus, making them better overall when skilled into than even a Meta 4 item that is better on paper - the long and short of things here, is that you really should consider fitting T2 guns on your ship if you have the right skills for it.

<More stuff here>

High Slots:

High slots are usually used for modules that target external vessels. That means their use is predominantly aggressive.

- Weapons (of all types, including Smart Bombs, Turrets, Missiles, Doomsday Devices, Bomb Launchers etc.)
- Logistics (Remote Energy, Armour, Hull and Shield Repairers/Transporters)
- Mining Lasers
- Tractor Beams
- Salvagers
- Mining Lasers (and similar)
- Cloaking Devices
- Probe Launchers
- Siege Modules (including things like Triage Modules, for capital ships)
- Cynosural Field Generators
- Automated Targeters
- Interdiction Generators
- Energy Neutralizers/Vampires
- Drone Range Boosting (Drone Link Augmentor)


Mid Slots:

Mid slots are used primarily for Shield Modules, Electronic Warfare, Propulsion Boosting, Capacitor Boosting and Tackling. That means that when equipping your mid slots if you tank using shields, you will have to juggle propulsion and tackle. There is also a limited amount of damage boosting available in the mid-slots. If you are a ship using electronic warfare, you will have to juggle your EWar capability with your durability. There are also modules available to boost Drone tracking and speed. Mid slots often see a lot of competition, as they are usually your "utility" modules.

- Shield Modules (Extenders, Boosters, Hardeners, Resistance Amplifiers and Rechargers)
- Capacitor Modules (Boosters, Batteries and Rechargers)
- Electronic Warfare Modules (ECM/Tracking Disruption/Target Painters/Sensor Dampers and ECCM)
- Propulsion (Afterburners, Micro Warp Drives and Micro Jump Drives)
- Tackle (Warp Disruptors, Scramblers and Stasis Webifiers)
- Damage Boosting (Tracking Computers and Links)
- Drone Upgrades (Omnidirectional Tracking Link and Drone Navigation Computers)
- Other Utility Modules (Passive targetters, scanners, command processors and hull repair modules)


Low Slots:

Low slots are used primarily for Armour modules, Damage Modules (both for weapons and drones), and general boosting of other attributes (including things like Electronic Warfare, Propulsion, Cargobay, and even some basic ability to upgrade a shield tank).

- Armour Modules (Plates, Hardeners, Repair and Energized/Resistance Plating)
- Damage Controls
- Capacitor Modules (Capacitor Flux Coils and Power relays)
- Damage Modules (Ballistic Control Systems, Gyrostabilizers, Heat Sinks, Magnetic Field Stabilizers, Tracking Enhancers, Drone Damage Enhancer)
- EWar Boosters (Signal Amplifiers, Sensor Backup Arrays)
- Fitting Modules (Auxilliary Power Controls, CPU Upgrades, Power Diagnostic Systems, Reactor Controls)
- Shield Enhancers (Flux Coils and Power Relays)
- Misc. Boosters (Inertial stabilizers, nanofibre structures, overdrive injectors, warp core stabilizers, reinforced bulkheads, mining upgrades, cargo expanders)



As you can see, there are hundreds of module types in EVE, and it will be a bit daunting. The majority of simple builds can be constructed with a few dozen of these types - almost all ships will want some form of propulsion (either an Afterburner ("AB") or a Micro Warp Drive ("MWD")).

They will also want some form of health buffer (either a shield extender, or an armour module - the largest you can fit without sacrificing too much of your CPU/Power Grid), and almost certainly a Damage Control. After that, you should consider weapons (unless your offensive ability comes from your drones, or your ship is going to serve another primary role), and then any utility modules you may need (e.g. cargo scanners for piracy).

Finally, consider increasing your tank (resistance modules, e.g. Energized Plating or Shield Hardeners), and/or increasing your ability to perform your assigned role (e.g. damage boosters like a Heat Sink, or EWar Boosters etc)


You must do this while staying within your ship's CPU and Power Grid maximums, which is part of the reason training the relevant skills is so important.
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#4 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

3. Ship Roles
Table of Contents:
  • Damage (Brawler / Sniper)
  • Logistics (Armour / Shield / Capacitor Repair)
  • Electronic Warfare (ECM / Damps / TDs / Painters / Neuts)
  • Tackle (Scrams, Points, Bubbles, Webs)
  • Scout/Intelligence
  • Common Applications
 
<This post is even more of a work in progress than most of the others on this page. I'm trying to put into words all of the ship types to help write the rest of the article, so if you can think of any roles/applications that we often use, please point them out so I can add them to the post.>


As I am sure you know, ships come in different sizes, and within those size categories (e.g. frigate/cruiser), you get ships of different classes (e.g. Heavy Assault Cruiser, Assault Frigate etc). You can further break down how each of those works (or can work) in a few different ways.
Don't forget that a ship can fulfil multiple roles within a fleet.

All ships fall into one (or more) of the following categories:
  • Damage Dealing
  • Logistics
  • Electronic Warfare
  • Tackle
If you understand each of these roles fully, then you may wish to skip the rest of this post - it simply outlines the common sub-categories for roles and how best to accomplish them. The main categories are:
  • Damage (DPS)
    Dealing damage is probably the most useful ability a ship can do - most ships will be able to deal some form of damage, even if it is just with their drones. Typically this means they will fall into one of two categories - either Sniper, or Brawler.
    • Sniper
      Snipers tend to emphasize range over actual damage dealt per second (although obviously, both is ideal). A "sniping" frigate will expect to hit to 25-40km in range, a sniping destroyer between 50-100km, and then sniper cruisers/battlecruisers/battleships between 100-249km. A good range to aim for is often 120km, as it keeps you outside the range of almost all non-sniping weapons, but prevents the enemy from jumping to you if they manage to get a fast ship close to you (e.g. an Inteceptor). Snipers have to be very aware of their surroundings and be very, very prepared when they are fighting. If any enemy is over 150km away, and one of your sniping fleetmates dies next to you, the enemy can warp to the wreck, suddenly closing the gap.
      Furthermore, if they manage to scan you down and jump to you, you may not be able to run away. Snipers often try and deal with this in many different ways, from neuting threats (to break scrams/points and let them warp) to taking Micro Jump Drives and making small leaps whenever they get into trouble.
      Snipers typically use Railguns, Beam Lasers or Artillery, and are usually mounted on ship hulls with a bonus to range (e.g. the Caldari Cormorant Destroyer).
    • Brawler
      Brawlers are the antithesis of Snipers - they are designed to take damage, and dish it out, both at close range. This means they need to emphasize statistics like raw DPS, but also things like tracking (if using turrets), and often benefit from high speed and small signature sizes. They tend to be webbed/scrammed a lot, and also often end up being the ships that apply the scram/web/point on the enemy. Not every fleet needs brawlers, but typically a fleet will consist mostly of either Brawlers or Snipers, as splitting up a fleet too much will spread out any logistics the fleet has.
      Brawlers typically fit shorter range weapons - e.g. Basters, Pulse Lasers or Autocannons, and are often hulls with either damage or durability bonuses.
  • Logistics (Logi)
    "Logistics" is the act of keeping other ships alive - typical logistics ships include T1 and T2 logistics cruisers (e.g. the Amarr Augoror and the Amarr Guardian), and Carriers. in RvB, we do not tend to field many carriers, and T2 logistics ships tend to be expensive to lose on a daily basis. That means you will mostly see T1 Logistics Cruisers.
    Note, T1 Logistics Frigates do exist, but because they only use small logistics modules, they should not be used on medium sized hulls or greater if you can avoid it - they simply do not have the repairing ("repping") power needed to keep medium+ sized hulls alive.
    Logistics is one of the best Force Multipliers in the EVE Universe, and a good repping backbone can allow a smaller fleet to easily defeat something many times larger than themselves.
    • Shield Repair
    • Armour Repair
    • Capacitor Repair
  • Electronic Warfare ("EWAR")
    • ECM
    • Remote Sensor Dampener ("Damp")
    • Tracking Disruptor ("TD")
    • Target Painter
    • Capacitor Warfare ("Neut")
  • Tackle
    • Warp Jamming
      • Warp Scrambling ("Scram")
      • Warp Disrupting ("Point")
      • Interdictor Bubbles ("Bubble")
    • Stasis Webifying
  • Scout/Intelligence ("Intel")
<Description of how things are combined together, and then list of common applications of the above principles>

Common applications:
  • Combat Probes (Scanning Down)
  • Advanced/Rear-Guard
  • Fast Tackle
  • Heavy Tackle
  • Bait
  • Black Ops (Bomber seperate?)
  • Fleet Sniper
  • Triarge Carrier

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#5 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

4. Small Ship Types (Frigates and Destroyers)

There are six types of T1 Frigates:
- Attack (Executioner, Condor, Atron, Slasher)
- Combat (Tormentor, Kestrel, Tristan,* Breacher)
- Brawling (Punisher, Merlin, Incursus, Rifter)
- Logistics (Inquisitor, Bantam, Navitas, Burst)
- Electronic Warfare (Crucifier, Griffin, Maulus, Vigil)
- Exploration (Magnate, Heron, Imicus, Probe)

However, the Exploration Frigates are not good at combat, and the Logistics and Electronic Warfare frigates are more rarely used than the remaining three.

Each race's frigates both emphasize their strengths, and are loosely in line with the other races' frigates.

The least complicated to fly are the "Brawling Frigates" - the Punisher, Merlin, Incursus and Rifter have a bonus to staying alive ("tanking") - either with a basic damage resistance, or a bonus to their repair amount. With the exception of the Rifter, they have more staying power than the majority of other frigates, even when stationary, and also have a bonus in damage output. They are well balanced and can all fit a good amount of tackle - the Punisher having the worst tackle layout, with only two mid slots (meaning you fit a propulsion module, and a single Warp Scrambler ("scram"), Warp Disruptor ("point") or Stasis Webifier ("web").

The Combat Frigates sacrifice durability for damage output (often good when frigates are being ignored) or Drones in the case of the Tristan, and the attack Frigates are often good at dealing damage, but get bonuses for warp jamming - being better at "fast tackle" - a common role for frigates.


<More info. and better formating to come later.>


Edited by Andal Altol, 27 June 2014 - 05:04 PM.

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#6 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

5. Medium Ship Types (Cruisers and Battlecruisers)
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#7 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

6. Large Ships and Beyond (Battleships, Carriers, Dreadnoughts, Supercarriers and Titans)
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#8 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

7. Ship Statistics
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#9 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

8. Advanced Ship Fitting - for Flying in Red Vs. Blue
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#10 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 08:33 PM

9. Further Reading and Additional Resources

Table of Contents:

  • Internal Resources
  • External Resources
    • Stand-Alone Programs and Desktop Tools
    • Mobile Applications
    • Other Websites and Guides

 
Below is a serious of external resources that you may find useful when learning how to fit your ships. Some of them may even prove useful after you are finished learning, and all are worth a read at some point during your piloting career. It features lists of Stand-Alone Desktop Tools, Mobile Tools, and concludes with a list of other useful websites and guides.

Internal Resources:

<Note about internal resources>

<Coming soon>
- Fleet-up
- Noobfleet
- Ship Fitting

External Resources:

<Note here about external resources>


Stand-Alone Programs and Desktop Tools:
These are predominantly Windows-based, but there are options for people who run Linux or Mac OS. Of particular note, EveHQ will likely need Mono to run in Linux. If you don't know what that means, don't worry; you're probably not a Linux user ;)

They include virtual ship fitters, skill planners, market checkers, mapping tools, and just about anything else you can imagine being helpful for EVE Online. If you have not yet tried one, they are certainly worth considering.

  • EVE Fitting Tool (EFT) - A Windows-only program.
    The EFT is one of the most frequently used external programs for EVE, it lets you import your character skills, and give you personalized statistics for a particular ship fitting. It will let you test fits to ensure everything would fit on your ship at once, and will let you experiment with different layouts without investing millions of ISK. Alternatives are available for those not using Windows, or not able to install programs - including Hangar and Pyfa below.
  • EveHQ - A Windows-based (Linux compatible) program.
    More than just a fitting tool, EVEHQ has a built in fitting tool, as well as character manager, a Mapping Feature (for Wormholes etc), and tools for managing POSes or Corps. It also has a plug-in system for user expansion. Overall, it is one of the most comprehensive EVE Tools around today.
  • EVEmon - A Windows-only program.
    A character planner. It lets you set up a plan of skills, and will notify you when your skill finishes training. It even lets you monitor your ISK Balance. It is often regarded as the best application for planning skills.
  • PYFA - A multi-platform Python release.
    PYFA is an alternative to EFT, that works on all platforms that can install Python - notably Windows, Linux and Mac OS. It is regularly kept up-to-date and is well regarded by the community.
  • Vitality - A Mac OS program.
    Vitality is an updated fork of Mac EVE Tools - a multi-purpose application, providing similar resources to EveHQ - a skill planner, ship fittings, and market viewer, amongst other features. Well worth a try if you run Mac OS.
  • Hangar - A browser-based application.
    Hangar is a fitting tool for use within your browser. Perhaps not quite as fully-featured as the other tools, it is still very robust, and requires no installation, plus is very graphical and supports easy sharing between users.
  • Dotlan RADAR Tracker - A browser-based tool for tracking fleet locations.
    Very useful when using Scouts and wanting to keep trac of where the main fleet is, it can be essential in fleet operations. Dotlan provides many other mapping services, and is a useful website in general - well worth checking out when you have the time. The Agony Unleashed Wiki (mentioned below) has a lovely guide on its use.
  • EVE-SKillplan.net - Online skill planning tool.

 

Mobile Applications:
While none of these truly compete with the ease of use or list of features of the desktop applications, some of them come closer than you would expect, and they are certainly a lot better than nothing. On the go and want to check your currently training skill, or set up a skill plan, play with ship fittings... They'll let you do just about anything you need, whether you're running Android or iOS.

  • Neocom - An iPhone application.
    It features a skill monitor, planner, items database, market information, contract monitoring, fitting tools and more. An application that comes well-recommended by other RvB pilots.
  • Aura - An Android application.
    Aura features a skill planner monitor, items database, market information, wallet feature, ship fitter... It is a very feature-complete application.
  • EVE Droid - An Android application.
    EVE Droid, much like Aura and Neocom, is a fully-fledged mobile application. It is a character monitoring and fitting tool, and unlike Aura, focuses more on the ship fitting aspect than the character monitoring. The commonly held opinion is that EVE Droid is superior to Aura for fitting on the go - perhaps give them both a try to find out?

Other Websites and Guides:

  • EVE University Wiki - A very full Wiki, with a variety of topics.
    The EVE University Wiki contains topics on almost all of EVE's many facets, including suggested ship builds, and more information on many topics covered in this guide. Topics of particular interest include: Amarr, Caldari, Gallente and Minmatar ship guides, and the Fitting Modules and Rig Guide.
  • Agony Unleashed Wiki - A focused Wiki, with basic and advanced lessons on PvP.
    Agony Unleashed are an alliance that runs PvP classes, and also maintains a very detailed wiki on important topics for the avid PvPer. As we in Red Vs. Blue are very PvP oriented, a lot of the information available from their Wiki is relevant to us, and understanding what your ship needs to be doing is vital to understanding how to fit it.
  • Failheap Challenge - A community dedicated to making ship fittings.
    A community dedicated to ship fitting and well known through the EVE Community. They have many PvP fittings, but many of them rely on drugs, implants or high skill points to function, however they do still work as an aim - stepping modules down to meta modules instead of T2 (etc) often works well if you don't have the pre-requisites for the fit itself. They have a more extensive collection than we do here, but care must be taken that you're picking a fit that will work well in the RvB environment.

Don't forget that we have other topics and sections of the forum available to you, whether it be in Noobfleet (for general help and questions), Ship Fitting Central (for finding fits made by the RvB community, and discussions on fitting individual ships) or Miramar (for more advanced topics).


N.B: May add ISK Guide on re-reading, if appropriate (can't remember atm if it's worth including).


Edited by Mangala Solaris, 10 September 2014 - 12:27 PM.

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#11 Lady Ayeipsia

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:36 PM

Nice... I may have content for you if I can keep on my current side project.

That said, I would highly recommend adding Evemon to your list of recommended aps.

http://evemon.battleclinic.com/

Perhaps EveHQ does better, but I have found Evemon to be an excellent tool for managing and planning a character's skill queue.
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#12 Miri Boirelle

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:43 PM

I use eveHq for everything but skill plans.. Evemon is wayy better for that (Imo)
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#13 Andal Altol

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 10:44 PM

I've moved EveMon to the main list instead of being a secondary entry under EveHQ. Does anybody have any other suggestions/comments on the format, or planned content? I'm going to try and flesh it out over the next week, but there's going to be a lot to write, so any suggestions will be appreciated.
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#14 Moira Rin

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 11:46 PM

For us Mac addicts, PYFA (Python Fitting Assistant) and Vitality are two good programs.

 

PYFA - https://github.com/DarkFenX/Pyfa

Vitality - https://github.com/sixones/vitality

 

edited to add linkage


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#15 Faux Tyr

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 02:20 AM

For us Mac addicts, PYFA (Python Fitting Assistant) and Vitality are two good programs.


Vitality - this is so win!
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#16 Andal Altol

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 09:16 AM

The way things are shaping up, I might need a section just for external tools. Perhaps some of the mobile ones also?


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#17 Moira Rin

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:02 AM

Andal, perhaps so.   One of the best iPhone/iPad that I've seen is Neocom, unfortunately as with so many independent developers, he can be a little slow to get updates out.


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#18 Relnaya Paakh

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:19 AM

For us Mac addicts, PYFA (Python Fitting Assistant) and Vitality are two good programs.

 

Woohoo, now with Vitality I have a EVEMon replacement at work!


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#19 Mangala Solaris

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:28 AM

The way things are shaping up, I might need a section just for external tools. Perhaps some of the mobile ones also?

 

That would be great!


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#20 Lady Ayeipsia

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 02:54 PM

Hmmmm... Should we make this guide a subforum? This way the guide could be stickied at the top and only contain relevant guide data.

The sub topics could be where we post suggestions and such.
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